RSS Feed

Tag Archives: Cake

Tres Leches Boston Cream Cake

Posted on

If you think it looks gooey then you’re right.

DSC_2247

Yeah, there are a few lumps in the chocolate.  So what.

DSC_2274

Tres leches means three milks.  This is actually a cake mix that’s prepared with buttermilk; so if you ask me it’s four milks.  In my opinion, the sweetened condensed milk is the best milk.  Think about it.  Have you ever made anything with a can of that stuff that wasn’t freaking amazing.  Lately I’ve been putting it in my coffee.  Spread the word.

DSC_2273

The chocolate on top is just a bag of semi-sweet chips that’s melted with half-and-half.

This recipe calls for an 18.25 ounce white cake mix.  I don’t buy a lot of cake mixes; so can someone please tell me when they got downsized to 15 or 16 ounces.  My guess is that it was sometime after I pulled this out of Coastal Living back in 2009.

Eat Well and Savor.

Advertisements

Lime Angel Food Cake

Posted on

I’m sorry to say that this cake didn’t blow my skirt up.  You know what I mean?

DSC_1980

It’s a shame, because I really want to love everything from Baked Elements.

DSC_1974

It started off okay:  you put the lime in the coconut — I mean, you put the lime in the egg whites.  Then there’s a lot of whipping going on.  I kind of wish the recipe would have seen fit to give a time estimate.  Getting to the stiff-peaks stage took a lot longer than I would have thought.  It has been about ten years since I made an angel food cake, so my memory was a little clouded.

DSC_1975

Speaking of guidance, here’s a direct quote:  Immediately invert the pan onto a work surface if the pan has feet, or place the center of the tube pan onto the neck of a bottle or metal funnel, and cool the cake completely.

I’m not sure what a pan with feet looks like, but I’m almost positive mine doesn’t have them.  I’m also not sure why you can’t just cool it on a wire rack like every other cake in the world.

End result:  if you choose Option B, be careful.  Don’t touch it while it’s hot or it could break all over your counter.  Maybe the trick is not to use an empty bottle.

DSC_1976

I really did want to love it.  There’s tequila in the glaze for crying out loud.

DSC_1984

Eat Well and Savor.

 

Cream Cheese Pound Cake

Posted on

And now we’ve come to my favorite part of the programming:  dessert.

DSC_1925

Don’t you just love how versatile pound cake is?   So far I’ve topped this with fresh berries and cool whip, leftover fruit compote and cool whip, peach jam and cool whip, and raspberry jam and cool whip.  Are you noticing a trend here with the cool whip?  In the interest of full disclosure, Jake had some with ice cream.  He’ll pretty much put ice cream on anything, though.

DSC_1926

As Joy the Baker says, this cake is tender and moist.  And, just so you know, if you plan ahead and take your butter out to soften, but forget the cream cheese, just stick it in your previously warmed oven while you load the dishwasher and then give it a little extra beat and you’ll be fine.

Here’s the link to a similar version of Joy Wilson’s pound cake.  If that doesn’t entice you to check out her site you should know that today she posted a Lasagna Grilled Cheese.   Oh, my.

Eat Well and Savor.

 

Chocolate Comfort Cake

Posted on

With Creamy Chocolate Frosting.

DSC_1581

Extra super melt-in-your-mouth creamy is more like it.  I can only assume that is a direct result of using heavy cream.

DSC_1580

Lisa Yockelson has Baking Style for sure.  The cake and the frosting calls for unsweetened chocolate.   I used a bar of SCHARFFEN BERGER.  I’ve used this brand many times before, but this is the first time I noticed the goat.

DSC_1564

At least I think it’s a goat.  My first instinct is that the goat was happy and dancing.

DSC_1565

Which made me think of my little naked dancing Indian tattoo.   No, it’s not the devil or King Neptune.

DSC_1578

Back to the cake.  This recipe makes a 13×9 cake which is supposed to be 20 servings; so of course I cut it into 16.  I’ve actually been cutting those pieces in half and having a little taste every day with my coffee.  LY says to keep this in the fridge, but I highly recommend bringing it to room temperature.

One last thing:  I decorated my mixer.

DSC_1566

It makes me smile, so I recommend you do it too.

Eat Well and Savor.

 

Marinated Strawberries

Posted on

Over Pound Cake.

DSC_1538

For such a simple recipe there’s a lot going on here.  The gist is basically to mix the strawberries with balsamic vinegar.  Honestly, I’m not a big fan, but the rest is worth it.

Giada, in Everyday Italian, recommends whipping your own cream.  I recommend buying Cool Whip.  However, I urge you to make your own pound cake.  Then we can go back to listening to GDL and brush the cake with amaretto.

DSC_1544

Then break up a couple amaretti cookies and you’re done.  If you happen to go looking for said cookies in Whole Foods and they tell you no can do because they’re seasonal, skip on over to World Market.  I love that place, but I always forget to consult my grocery list when I’m in there.

Eat Well and Savor.

 

My Mother’s Mayo Cake

Posted on

With Cream Cheese Frosting.

DSC_1405

And this time it really is MY mother’s recipe.  Well, surely she got it from some magazine or the back of the Hellman’s jar a million years ago.

DSC_1390

It starts out very basically:  sugar, mayo, and cocoa powder.  My mother insists that you can only use Hellman’s.

DSC_1391

Isn’t that a beautiful color?  That’s what six heaping tablespoons of cocoa powder will do.  Don’t tell my mom, but I actually used special dark this time.  She doesn’t like change.   See the above Hellman’s remark.

DSC_1395

Add the remaining ingredients and bake away.

DSC_1397

I actually let this cool overnight and made my frosting the next morning.  Let me tell you about this frosting:  It’s your basic cream cheese frosting, or so I thought.  I didn’t have a measurement for the vanilla.  I assumed it would be one teaspoon, but I did a little googling.  It turns out most of the recipes I found had a cup or maybe two of powdered sugar.  Well, my mom doesn’t mess around and this version has four cups.

Get your glass of milk ready.

DSC_1408

For the cake:

1.5 cups granulated sugar

6 heaping TB cocoa powder

1.5 cups mayonnaise

3 cups AP flour

3 tsp baking soda

3 tsp vanilla

1.5 cups water

Combine sugar, mayo, and cocoa powder.  Add flour, baking soda, vanilla, and water.  Grease and flour a 9×13 pan and bake for 30 minutes at 350.

For the frosting:

4 cups powdered sugar

8 ounces softened cream cheese

1 stick of butter

1 tsp vanilla

Mix together and frost.

This cake tastes amazing at room temperature.  However, I am a huge fan of the refrigerated version.  Not to mention there’s that big debate about keeping cream cheese cold and all.

I should mention that we had this for Jake’s birthday!  Sorry I didn’t get a picture with all of the candles.

Eat Well and Savor.

Salted Peanut Butter Cake Balls

Posted on

I really wish someone would write a whole cookbook on things that you can do with salted peanut butter.

DSC_0992

They totally remind me of buckeyes!

I actually feel a little bit guilty about these.  My friend Avery gave me a cake ball baker two years ago for Christmas.  I generally don’t like to jump into the latest trend, but I do get a birthday cake pop at Starbucks every once in a while.   Needless to say, said baker is still in the box and sitting in the basement.

DSC_0990

Then I stumbled upon a little book simply called Cake Balls by Robin Ankeny and Charlotte Lyon.  It turns out you pretty much just bake a cake, crumble it, mix with some frosting, roll it into balls, and voila.  I realize I’m probably the last person on the planet to learn this.

DSC_0993

The point is that the cake ball maker is still collecting dust.   Please, don’t tell Avery.   She just had twin girls three weeks ago, so she won’t have time to read this blog for another 18 years.  Did I mention she already has a two-year-old daughter?

DSC_0999

Cake balls were really just an excuse to use these cutie little wrappers.

DSC_0998

The book describes cake balls as amazingly delicious bite-size treats.  I couldn’t have said it better myself.  And here’s a secret:  I used a boxed mix and a can of frosting.  The book contains recipes from scratch, which I am usually a stickler for.  I figured if I was going to spend time scooping, rolling, and dipping, then I deserved a shortcut.

Eat Well and Savor.